d e t a i l s

  WHAT I'M READING   READING NOW  
   
  i hope to read every day.

believing that 'hoping' for something is not enough to get it done, i, like all parts of my life that matter to me, regiment this behavior. i do this by drawing lines in the sand at the start of every week for every place i 'hope' to arrive at and working towards reaching each of those marks.

because i have a number of different reading goals, it takes multiple lines in the sand to guide this part of my life. since i have multiple interests and aspirations that i'm interested in reading, i approach this is by drawing four lines in the sand. one for each of the following types of books:
  1. professional
  2. life improvement
  3. recreational
  4. review
for each of these, i have a book of the week. i then set a goal for each, like 50 pages, and then chip away at each moving in and out of them from day to day, but with the goal of reading 50 pages in each by week's end.

the fourth category, the review, refers to a book that i have read in the past that i will pluck from the shelf and revisit, rereading flagged passages and perusing the notes i made in the margins. while this obviously lends itself to professional books i've read (which are predominately not listed on this page *) and self-help sorts of literature, it is sometimes enjoyable to review faulkner or lewis just to re-experience their jaw-dropping, neuron-popping use of language.

* for a few reasons, in 2014 i have done a lot of reading for work which accounts for the paucity of entries here.
 

The Clan of the Cave Bear
Jean M. Auel
 



READ BEFORE BOOKS FROM : 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014


 



The Invisible Man
Ralph Ellison
12.2000

Typically when I read a book from the MLA's top 100, I can see why it's there, whether I agree or not. Not only is this book in the top 100, it is high in the top 100. I'm not certain on what basis though. While I found it to contain a unique tale, I found the plot scattered and unlikely. Furthermore, this book is to politics what Lolita is to sex; there's plenty of it in there, but no direct reference to it in the language. This most likely represents my majority reason for struggling through the piece in that I know more about feminine hygiene products than I do about politics. Can you say no prayer.
link to this review





 
 



The War of the Worlds
H.G. Wells
12.2000

Possibly, the most amazing aspect to this novel rest in its timeless nature. That Wells crafted this tale in 1898, same as his Time Machine, simply boggles the mind. I guess its dated nature explains why this has such a different feel from modern day sci-fi. There is a simplicity to the narrative style which sincerely conveys the primitive nature the human race would truly assume given such an event. You just don't get that feel with Bruce Willis behind the helm or nuclear weapons in the equation.
link to this review





 
 



Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (book 3)
J.K. Rowling
10.2000

I read an account of someone bashing Potter for it's ill representation of women/girls in the series. This stands as one of the more absurd dings against this fairly controversial series. I mean seriously, it is written by a woman and the main female character is also the smartest, hyper-smart actually, not to mention the voice of reason. If the detractors of Potter cannot do better than this, they should capitulate the battle.
link to this review





 
 



The Harried Leisure Class
Stephen B. Linder
09.2000

Harried represents the work of a Swedish intellect who set out to observe a technologically advanced society (us) and the ramifications our evolution had on our lifestyle. The assumed postulate has always been "technology evolves culture" providing benefits and amenities not available to primitive peoples. Done. So what happened? Why so many abject and woeful people? According to Linder, too many goods and not enough time to play with all the toys. In a society with a lot of product, before you may consume, you must produce and in order to produce, others must consume. We have us a vicious little circle here. But, ultimately the lesson smacks of high school grammar, we all know how it works, we just don't know the rules.
link to this review





 
 



The Invisible Man
H.G. Wells
08.2000

Wells, again, demonstrates that his mind rode on the creative concord of his time. This story is very authentically told with an extraordinary eye for the details given the extraordinary scenario. There is no question that imaginative abilities like this are not pedestrian. The only flaw resides in the fact that this scientist was smart enough to make his internal organs and skin invisible but did not have a convention to garner transparent apparel. Our hero therefore has to wander the streets of winter-time London buck naked. Thought of everything but the clothes. Damn the details!
link to this review





 
 



The Count of Monte Christo
Alaxandre Dumas
06.2000

Hmmm. This was touted as the revenge story to pummel all revenge stories. If speaking of simple duration, I would concur, but if these sage reviewers are speaking of true visceral revenge, I doth contest. Due to the longish nature of the book one certainly feels the pain that comes from loss of time. But, as for good ole medieval payback, I'm afraid it falls short. Now what act serves suitable in this scenario? I'm afraid one who has not endured such trauma is capable of inventing the requisite recompense, but I do know that you would much rather have the count on your ass than Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus.
link to this review





 
 



Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (book 2)
J.K. Rowling
04.2000

I'm a little surprised there isn't a greater stink about these novels that there is. Or should I say, lesser books have been attacked with greater vigor. Given the amount of adolescent violence and mayhem portrayed tags the book as a non-American based work. I just don't think it would fly here post columbine, etc. And, I read where this series is credited with single-handedly getting kids in the library again. Whoo-Hoo!
link to this review





 
 



Brave New World
Aldous Huxley
04.2000

This didn't speak to me like it seems to have spoken to many before me.
link to this review





 
 



Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (book 1)
J.K. Rowling
03.2000

Good young adult fiction is as rare as above par science fiction. Therefore, when something sound comes out, people consume it like repeat ticket buyers in line for Titantic. Rowling creates an engrossing tale here. The world she has created possesses enough detail and creativity to keep the story moving and enjoyable.
link to this review





 
 



An American Tragedy
Theodore Dreiser
03.2000

Let me first say that this book has been the best I've read in some time. Based on an actual criminal record this psychological tour de force compels one, if the reader elects, to perform some crafty mental gymnastics. The very discussion got me in quite a banter session at a dinner party - sorry for demonstrating empathy towards someone who is not me. I can admit that this tale touched me due to parallels I drew to my own past and would not expect it to touch others similarly, especially women. However, I am comfortable asking nay-sayers to hold any diatribes until you walk in the birkenstocks of the accused.
link to this review





 
 



Battlefield Earth
L. Ron Hubbard
02.2000

Hubbard's opus makes The Stand read like a USA Today article. I'm hip to and respect the literary technique of forcing a reader through a long journey to emulate a long journey, but I'm not seeking high literary prowess out of the likes of Scientology's father. It took me about four cracks at this tome to finally cap it for good. But, on its side, the movie makes the book look like one of man's greatest contributions to the arts.
link to this review





 
 



For Whom the Bell Tolls
Ernest Hemingway
01.2000

The plot of this book is basic, the storytelling is not. Hemingway's ability to describe a moment is so powerful and the image so vivid, you may think it your own memory. I always marveled at a great writer's ability to describe something as simple as a man lighting a cigarette and you don't picture someone you've seen lighting a cigarette, but instead perfectly visualize Hemingway's guy lighting a smoke.
link to this review





 
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